Business

Process to Reopen Pennsylvania

Last updated: 4:15 p.m., May 22, 2020

The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is an unprecedented event that has impacted every part of the globe. Pennsylvania has seen a similar unprecedented burden of COVID-19 and has taken equally unprecedented measures to save lives and reduce morbidity of the COVID-19 virus.

The commonwealth has responded aggressively to the spread of COVID-19, first by working to contain the virus through contact tracing and quarantines for residents who came in contact with someone who tested positive for the virus to slow sustained community spread. When sustained community spread was established, the commonwealth moved to mitigation efforts early in the response by issuing orders to close schools and non-life-sustaining businesses; and to restrict large gatherings. This decision to respond aggressively has proven to be an essential and effective measure to reduce the spread of COVID-19 and ultimately save an unrealized number of Pennsylvanians’ lives.

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Responding to COVID-19 | PA.GOV

On May 4, 2020, Governor Wolf provided guidance that details procedures businesses must follow to conduct in-person operations in counties that move to the yellow phase of reopening.

All businesses, including non-profits, permitted to conduct in-person operations are subject to this guidance. This guidance is based on the building safety and business safety orders, under which nearly all life-sustaining businesses have been operating during the red phase.

Under the yellow phase of reopening, life-sustaining businesses that could not conduct either all or part of their operations via telework will continue to conduct their operations in-person, and many non-life-sustaining businesses will be permitted to restart their in-person operations through the loosening of some restrictions under the stay-at-home and business closure orders.

Protecting Employees

All businesses that have been conducting their operations in whole or in part remotely through individual teleworking must continue telework operations for each of those employees.

All businesses

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Business Formation – Choose a Business Structure: LLC, Corporation, Sole Proprietorship, Partnership

Common questions

What is a limited liability company?

A limited liability company, or LLC, is a business entity created under state law that combines characteristics of both a corporation and a partnership. Like a corporation, the owners of an are generally not personally liable for company debts. Like a sole proprietorship or a partnership, an LLC is, by default, a “pass through” entity for tax purposes. This means that the LLC does not pay taxes on its profits, but instead, profits and losses are “passed through” to the owners, who must then pay tax on their share of LLC income.

How does a corporation protect my personal assets?

If a business operates as a corporation, the business owners, called shareholders, are not personally liable for debts or other claims against the corporation. That’s because the corporation is a separate legal entity from its owners. If a corporation complies with the

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What Does Business Casual Attire Mean?

Business casual sounds like a breeze. After all, with this dress code, you won’t have to worry about what to wear to work, right? Not quite. 

In fact, this dress code guideline is a frequent source of confusion for workers. And it’s not their fault — there really isn’t a clear, standardized definition. Business casual may mean different things in different companies, cities, and industries. And on top of that, understanding the subtle differences between “business” and “business casual” isn’t easy.

One thing is clear: Dressing in shorts and a t-shirt or a sundress and sandals is too casual. But wearing a full suit is overly formal. 

When in doubt, it’s better to err on the side of dressing too formally, rather than too casually. But where’s the line? Get advice on appropriate business casual attire for men and women, along with tips on what to wear — and what

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How to Write a Business Plan (with Pictures)

About This Article

Article SummaryX

To write a business plan, start with an executive summary that lays out your grand vision for your business. Follow that with a section that describes what products and services your company will offer. Then, write a marketing section where you detail how you’re going to inform people about your business. You’ll also want to include a section on your business model and how it will operate. Finally, conclude your business plan by letting investors know what you need from them. For help with

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Starting an Internet Business | FTC Consumer Information

An internet business can sound like a dream: work from home, set your own hours, be your own boss. But if you’re considering buying an internet business opportunity, watch out for promises of big or guaranteed earnings. Regardless of the stories you’ve might have read or heard about college-age entrepreneurs turning into internet gazillionaires, there’s no such thing as a sure thing.

Any online business opportunity that promises guaranteed income, large returns, or a “proven system” is likely a scam. If you pay for the so-called opportunity, you’re then often asked to pay even more: for business coaching or mentoring services to guarantee or increase your business’s success. The money you spend on those extra coaching services is almost always more money down the drain.

Short on Details

An internet business is just like any other business: it requires a solid business plan. Anyone who sells legitimate business opportunities should

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Business Plan, Business Planning, Strategic Planning, Venture Strategies, Working Capital, Cash Flow, Business Ideas, Financial Projections, Cash Flow Planning, Business Strategy, Strategic Planners, Strategic Plans, Mission Statements, New Ventures

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  • Getting New Business Ideas: Considering
    strengths and weaknesses, getting and assessing ideas, and next
    steps.
  • Devising Business Plan Strategies:
    Success and failure, existing strategies and future SWOTs, strategic
    combinations and statements, and next steps.
  • Developing a Strategic Business Plan: Key
    steps, hindsight plus cause & effect, SWOTs and planning
    worksheet.
  • How to Write a Business Plan: Importance
    of strategy, preparatory work, planning to plan, outline of a
    business plan, and tips when writing.
  • Insights into a Business Plan:
    Scope of survey, overview of findings, lessons learnt, and detailed
    results and conclusions.
  • Preparing Financial Projections:
    Financial modeling with a computer, how models work, planning
    to plan, and tips & traps.
  • Making Cashflow Forecasts: Importance
    of cash, cash flow vs. profit, calculating cash flows, planning
    and the pitfalls, and improving cash
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Quiet Light Brokerage

Quiet Light BrokerageHome – Quiet Light Brokerage


Meet the Team
that Will Help You Sell
Your Online Business

The advisors at Quiet Light Brokerage have each bought, sold, and started their own online businesses. In fact, when you look at the collective resume of the team that will help you plan your exit, it’s almost unbelievable.

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Mark scaled an online magazine from 0 to 220,000 subscribers – in 18 months

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Bryan founded the world’s first Internet due diligence company

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Jason raised over $10 million in venture capital investment

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Amanda built a company at age 24 which was featured in the TIME magazine

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Amanda launched an affiliate business as a hobby – became top affiliate in 4 months

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Walker authored “Buy Then Build” – a #1 Bestseller in Entrepreneurship on Amazon

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Walker

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Business Associate Contracts | HHS.gov

SAMPLE BUSINESS ASSOCIATE AGREEMENT PROVISIONS
(Published January 25, 2013)

Introduction

    A “business associate” is a person or entity, other than a member of the workforce of a covered entity, who performs functions or activities on behalf of, or provides certain services to, a covered entity that involve access by the business associate to protected health information.  A “business associate” also is a subcontractor that creates, receives, maintains, or transmits protected health information on behalf of another business associate.  The HIPAA Rules generally require that covered entities and business associates enter into contracts with their business associates to ensure that the business associates will appropriately safeguard protected health information.  The business associate contract also serves to clarify and limit, as appropriate, the permissible uses and disclosures of protected health information by the business associate, based on the relationship between the parties and the activities or services being performed by the business

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