For home care workers, COVID-19 is a health crisis and economic one

angel may

This story was published in partnership with The 19th, a nonprofit, nonpartisan newsroom reporting on gender, politics and policy. 

Here’s how the federal interest rate can help save the economy during a recession

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

When COVID-19 came to New Orleans, Nicole Alston felt the impact immediately.

Alston, 45, is a home care worker who helps clients — often people who are older, or who have disabilities — do things like eat, bathe and get dressed. 

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

As her family’s breadwinner, Alston earns $8.50 per hour. The money’s barely enough. She and her husband are both diabetic. Her 19-year-old daughter, also diabetic, and 16-year-old nephew live at home with her. On weekdays, she takes care of three of her grandchildren.

Before the pandemic, Alston, who works through a home care company, saw

Read More

Hedge Funds Shift Out Tech and Health Care, Making a Cyclical Bet.

angel may


Illustration by Elias Stein

Text size

Hedge funds shifted from market-leading technology and health-care investments in the second quarter, adding to bets on a cyclical recovery with larger positions in industrial and financial shares—and cheaper relative valuations in the market.

Goldman Sachs analysts recently compiled holdings of 815 hedge funds that managed about $2 trillion as the third quarter began. From the start of the year until Aug. 19, the

S&P 500

index rose 6% while the Nasdaq 100 added 30%. That’s much better than the average equity hedge fund in Goldman’s analysis, which returned 2% over the same period. But hedge funds’ best ideas did beat the S&P, with a basket of top-50 holdings returning 18%.

Health-care stocks remain the most concentrated hedge fund holdings, at about 21%, well above their 14% in the Russell 3000 index. But hedge funds cut their health-care position by three percentage points in

Read More

National Institutes of Health panel explains convalescent plasma amid confusion over possible COVID-19 treatment

angel may

As medics and scientists decide whether convalescent plasma can be used as a treatment for COVID-19, both confidence in and criticism for the method have grown.

Amid what’s become a heady infusion of hope and politics, public health experts tasked with shaping treatment guidelines now find themselves compelled to clarify the state of science as it stands, and cut through the noise.

On Aug. 23, the Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency authorization for plasma, arguing the potentially promising treatment is safe enough to merit broader use.

President Donald Trump championed the FDA’s authorization as a “historic announcement” for a therapy with an “incredible rate of success,” but a panel of experts convened by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) put out a memo Tuesday saying there is “insufficient data” recommending either for or against convalescent plasma as treatment of COVID-19.

The note instantly set off a flurry of

Read More

Silvia Paz enlists community members to help solve health and economic issues of California’s marginalized groups

angel may

Silvia Paz is executive director of Alianza, which brings together community members, nonprofits and government leaders to address the health and economic issues faced by the most marginalized residents of the Coachella Valley in Southern California.



a person holding a sign posing for the camera: Silvia Paz, executive director of Alianza, is a finalist for a national leadership award.


© Courtesy of Alianza
Silvia Paz, executive director of Alianza, is a finalist for a national leadership award.

The group’s work recognizes the importance and limitations of a strong safety net, identifies underlying causes of poverty, and works for changes is policies and systems. Community members are part of the process throughout. The implementation of restorative justice, an alternative to punitive discipline practices at schools in the east valley, is listed as one of her most notable accomplishments as director.

Loading...

Load Error

Paz, 37, is also president of the Coachella Valley Unified School District Board of Trustees. 

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

As part

Read More

Health department announces $25 million for personal protective equipment for frontline workers

angel may

Posted: Updated:

VIRUS OUTBREAK VIRAL QUESTIONS MASKS

AP Illustration/Peter Hamlin;

Lansing, Mich. (WLNS) A $25 million grant program for personal protective equipment (PPE) will allow medical facilities and other providers to keep their staff and patients safe, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) announced. 

The grant will assist facilities facing increased costs for PPE as they provide critical services to Michiganders during the COVID-19 pandemic. This grant program is funded through the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act. 

“Our frontline workers put their lives on the line every day to save lives and protect us from COVID-19, and it’s crucial that we continue to ensure their access to personal protective equipment,” said Governor Whitmer. “This grant program will put CARES Act dollars to use and help us protect our brave frontline workers, their patients,

Read More

The loss of employer-sponsored health insurance can be a serious concern for older people

angel may

Michael Kerr thought he would be back to work by now. When the 52-year-old from Reading was put on furlough from his retail manager position in mid-March, he figured the business would reopen by April, reinstating him and other employees.



a man sitting in front of a computer: James Long, a health-care insurance broker at his computer inside his home office in Royersford, helps people that have lost


© ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/The Philadelphia Inquirer/TNS
James Long, a health-care insurance broker at his computer inside his home office in Royersford, helps people that have lost “job-based health insurance” during the COVID-19 pandemic.

But as his furlough dragged on into June, he realized his job loss would become permanent, leaving him without income or his employer-sponsored health insurance.

Loading...

Load Error

“I felt like I needed to cover myself in bubble wrap and stay in the house,” he said. “Every ache and pain got a little bit more scary.”

Kerr is one of millions of American workers who have lost their job-based health insurance during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Kaiser Family

Read More

New evaluation of universal health coverage, world will likely fall short of WHO goal

angel may

SEATTLE (August 27, 2020) – A new study projects that 3.1 billion people will still lack effective health service coverage in 2023, with 968 million of those residing in South Asia. This falls short of the World Health Organization (WHO) goal of 1 billion more people benefiting from universal health coverage (UHC) between 2019 and 2023.

Universal health coverage is defined as all people receiving quality health services without incurring financial hardship. The paper, part of the Global Burden of Disease study, was published today in the international medical journal The Lancet. Researchers focused only on measuring service coverage, developing a new framework to capture how well countries align health services with the needs of the population and how well or poorly those services contribute to people’s health.

“Universal health coverage is more than just access to health care,” said Dr. Rafael Lozano, the senior author of the study

Read More

Universal health coverage study reveals that the world likely to fall short of WHO goal

angel may

A new study projects that 3.1 billion people will still lack effective health service coverage in 2023, with 968 million of those residing in South Asia. This falls short of the World Health Organization (WHO) goal of 1 billion more people benefiting from universal health coverage (UHC) between 2019 and 2023.

Universal health coverage is defined as all people receiving quality health services without incurring financial hardship. The paper, part of the Global Burden of Disease study, was published today in the international medical journal The Lancet. Researchers focused only on measuring service coverage, developing a new framework to capture how well countries align health services with the needs of the population and how well or poorly those services contribute to people’s health.

Universal health coverage is more than just access to health care. Measuring access is necessary but not sufficient

Read More

Health Insurance Exchange Market Worth Observing Growth:

angel may

Health Insurance Exchange (HIX) Market

COVID-19 Outbreak-Global Health Insurance Exchange (HIX) Industry Market Report-Development Trends, Threats, Opportunities and Competitive Landscape in 2020 is latest research study released by HTF MI evaluating the market, highlighting opportunities, risk side analysis, and leveraged with strategic and tactical decision-making support. The study provides information on market trends and development, drivers, capacities, technologies, and on the changing investment structure of the COVID-19 Outbreak-Global Health Insurance Exchange (HIX) Market. Some of the key players profiled in the study are InsuranceMarketplace, Nevada Health Link, Noridian Healthcare Solutions, LLC, UPMC Health Plan, Inc, Access Health CT, Costcoquote, DC Health Link, AON Inc, Liazon, United HealthCare Services, HealthCare.Gov, HealthSource RI, Your Health Idaho, REALTORS, SCRIPPS, Extend Health, Inc, Pearl Health Care Exchange, State Bar of Texas, BEWELLNM & International Medical Exchange.

COVID-19 Outbreak- Health Insurance Exchange (HIX) Market Overview:

If you are involved in the COVID-19 Outbreak- Health Insurance

Read More

Wisconsin Unrest, ‘Right To Try,’ Personal Health Stories Also In Spotlight At GOP Convention

angel may

Health care policy issues are interwoven in some of the key talking points of convention speakers.


The New York Times:
With Wisconsin Unrest As Backdrop, Republicans Intensify Law-And-Order Message 


Republicans used the third night of their convention on Wednesday to amplify warnings of violence and lawlessness under Democratic leadership, trying to capitalize on the worsening unrest in Wisconsin to reclaim moderate voters who might be reluctant to hand President Trump a second term. The party also made appeals to social conservatives with attacks on abortion and accusations that the Democrats and their nominee, Joseph R. Biden Jr., were “Catholics in name only.” And they intensified their effort to lift Mr. Trump’s standing among women with testimonials vouching for him as empathetic and as a champion of women in the workplace — from women who work for him, a number of female lawmakers and his daughter-in-law, Lara Trump. (Martin and Burns,

Read More