Money

How to Save Time and Money Food Shopping

Shopping for groceries has been fraught enough of late—and that was before food prices spiked. Now consumers need to find new ways to economize on what they buy at the store while continuing to stay safe as they shop.

Grocery prices rose a seasonally adjusted 1 percent between April and May, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, which tracks the prices of goods and services that Americans consume. That’s not as high as the 2.6 percent increase between March and April. But taken together, those increases mean Americans paid an average 4.8 percent more for “food at home,” as the BLS calls it, than they did in May 2019.

Some of the largest increases are due to events you’ve seen in the news. Beef and veal posted their highest-ever one-month gain, 10.8 percent, the result of temporary shutdowns of meatpacking plants where workers were infected with the coronavirus.

Read More

31 Hidden Ways You’re Bleeding Money Every Month

There are some expenses you plan for every month — your rent or mortgage, utilities, your cellphone bill, etc. — but there are also a lot of hidden expenses you’re paying for regularly that you might not be aware of. These little costs could quickly add up, whittling away at your hard-earned paycheck.

Uncover the hidden ways you’re losing money every month, so you can start making moves to stop the bleeding.

Last updated: June 15, 2020

Not Tracking Your Spending

You should be able to account for every dollar you spend. Keep track of your spending with a budgeting app, spreadsheet or even a notebook. Simply recording what you’re spending money on will make it easier to spot any hidden expenses.

Paying Checking Account Fees

Some banks charge monthly fees or service charges for their checking accounts. Those fees could end up costing you over $100 a year —

Read More

Joe Biden and ActBlue rake in big money in May

Joe Biden’s campaign announced Monday they raised $80.8 million in May along with the Democratic National Committee and joint fundraising committee. CBS News political unit associate producer Sarah Ewall-Wice reports that it’s the most the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee has raised to date during the 2020 presidential election cycle. According to the campaign, more than half of the donors last month were new contributors, signaling a surge in grassroots momentum, with more than 1.5 million new supporters joining the campaign in the last few weeks. The campaign also said the number of online donors has tripled since February. The average online donation in May was $30 and educators continue to be listed as the largest occupation group for donors. 

“I’m humbled and honored that you have put your trust in me as your presumptive Democratic nominee. And I’m incredibly honored by the support I’ve received from you all,” Biden wrote

Read More

Most money made through the App Store does not go through Apple, company says amid questions over the ‘digital marketplace’

Apple says that most of the money being “facilitated” by its App Store does not go through the company, as it unveiled new research into the scale of the digital economy.

The App Store helped facilitate some $519 billion in billings and sales last year, it claimed based on new analysis.

Most of that money did not go through App Store purchases or in-app payments, it said, but rather simply relied on software for Apple’s platforms to make goods and services available.

The new announcement comes amid questions over the scale of app stores run by Apple, Google and other companies. Last week, Axios reported that US antitrust investigators asked Apple whether chief executive Tim Cook would give testimony as part of a probe into competition among tech companies.

Apple and Mr Cook have repeatedly said that they welcome the scrutiny of the App Store that has come with increased

Read More

3 College Students Raise Money To Help Black Atlanta Businesses

ATLANTA, GA — Many small businesses in Atlanta have been affected by the coronavirus pandemic. They were forced to temporarily close in March, until Gov. Brian Kemp announced that businesses and restaurants could resume operations in late April.

For some, reopening wasn’t an option. They had lost so much already. As those businesses who could reopen began to do so, a movement for justice rippled through the country after the death of George Floyd on May 25 in police custody in Minnesota. His death — along with the deaths of Ahmaud Arbery in coastal Georgia, Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky, and other African Americans — sparked demands to end police brutality and racism in America.

Here in Atlanta, protests have taken place daily, for over two weeks. Although many have been peaceful, there were instances where some protesters vandalized and stole from local businesses, according to police. With so many

Read More

Can’t Make Money Right Now? Free Up Cash in Your Budget

You’re not the only one with a tight budget. Millions of Americans are currently struggling with unemployment, lost hours and lowered wages.

There’s little comfort in knowing that others are feeling strapped. But you may be relieved to hear there are ways to make things easier — even if you’re out of work or can’t make more money.

We talked to financial experts for advice about getting more mileage out of the money you have available right now. Here are their tips for finding extra money in your monthly budget.

Go line by line

Depending on where you live, you’re probably spending a lot of time at home these days. Devote at least some of the free time to analyzing your finances.

Go over every single transaction in your checking account, savings account, credit card bills and so forth, says Robinson Crawford, certified financial planner and founder of the adviser

Read More

Big money may soon be chasing the ‘Robinhood’ investor: Morning Brief

Monday, June 15, 2020

Get the Morning Brief sent directly to your inbox every Monday to Friday by 6:30 a.m. ET. 

Subscribe

Institutional investors are underexposed to the stock market

One of the most fascinating stories in finance right now is the explosion of retail investors riding the stock market’s current three-month long rally higher.

“The global pandemic brought retail investors back into the equity market after being largely absent for a decade,” Deutsche Bank strategist Binky Chadha wrote last week.

“They were important buyers of the correction in equities.”

The phenomenon has caught the attention of more Wall Street experts, who are split on whether or not this ‘Robinhood’ class of investors is fueling the rally. However, they do seem to agree on one thing: as the retail class has been cleaning up, the big institutional money has largely been missing out.

“Institutional investor positioning in equities by contrast

Read More

Can’t make money right now? Free up cash in your budget

You’re not the only one with a tight budget. Millions of Americans are currently struggling with unemployment, lost hours and lowered wages.

There’s little comfort in knowing that others are feeling strapped. But you may be relieved to hear there are ways to make things easier — even if you’re out of work or can’t make more money.

We talked to financial experts for advice about getting more mileage out of the money you have available right now. Here are their tips for finding extra money in your monthly budget.

GO LINE BY LINE

Depending on where you live, you’re probably spending a lot of time at home these days. Devote at least some of the free time to analyzing your finances.

Go over every single transaction in your checking account, savings account, credit card bills and so forth, says Robinson Crawford, certified financial planner and founder of the adviser

Read More

Unemployed because of coronavirus? How to make money from home right away

If you know your way around a sewing machine, can quick-fix a washer/dryer, fridge, boat or car, have an eye for antiques or possess some other random – even quirky – expertise, you could make tens of thousands of dollars working from home within the next month or two. True story. 

Unemployment rates are at the highest peak in decades, and 1 of 6 people in America are out of work. Families are trying to figure out how to survive the pandemic and look for a new job. Here’s something very few of the newly unemployed realize: There’s work out there. A lot of it. And it might be just a few clicks away. 

Shopping reinvented: America’s stores, malls reopen with masks, curbside pickup and closed fitting rooms

Wearables as first line of defense? Tests expand on whether Fitbit, Apple Watch could predict coronavirus

In-demand experts earn as much as

Read More

BUILT BY GIRLS: Top 5 money myths debunked for the class of 2020

At a time when only online commencements are taking place, Cashay sister site BUILT BY GIRLS is giving its financial advice for the class of 2020. Through honest conversations, the team also debunks common money myths to ease the worries of recent graduates.

“I didn’t really start making money moves until well into my post-grad life. I waffled a bit when it came to getting my personal finances in order, let alone student loans, retirement savings, or anything else,” said Danya Sherbini, the community and programs lead at BUILT BY GIRLS. “And now it feels like I’m catching up when I see some of my peers doing really adult things like buying a house.”

While Sherbini can’t change her past, she hopes her experience will inspire new graduates to be more proactive earlier in their adult lives.

“I always thought I could just be young for now and the adulting

Read More