Trump sidesteps America’s racism and police brutality and labels protests ‘mob rule’

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President Trump and Melania Trump arrive for his acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention on the South Lawn of the White House on Thursday. <span class=(Associated Press)” src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/ADyLPW8fGNIHqQXl6QKTwQ–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTcwNTtoPTM5Ni45ODIxNDI4NTcxNDI4Mw–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/la_times_articles_853/7e2bda77cb48eb363cce82808691a07c” data-src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/ADyLPW8fGNIHqQXl6QKTwQ–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTcwNTtoPTM5Ni45ODIxNDI4NTcxNDI4Mw–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/la_times_articles_853/7e2bda77cb48eb363cce82808691a07c”/
President Trump and Melania Trump arrive for his acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention on the South Lawn of the White House on Thursday. (Associated Press)

President Trump’s speech accepting the Republican presidential nomination gave him an opportunity to do something he has so far failed to do in explicit terms.

It gave him a prime-time TV platform to reassure Black Americans that he understood the grief, rage and aching sense of deja vu that strike them when they see footage of another Black person killed or injured by police.

He didn’t take it.

Instead, while standing on a stage outside the White House, Trump accused demonstrators of bringing anarchy to the nation’s cities. He sidestepped America’s long-standing racism and the police brutality against Black people that have sent protesters into the streets.

“When there is police misconduct, the justice system must hold wrongdoers

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On The Money: Meadows says Trump willing to sign $1.3T coronavirus bill | Consumer spending slowed in July as coronavirus surge dampened recovery

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Happy Friday and welcome back to On The Money. I’m Sylvan Lane, and here’s your nightly guide to everything affecting your bills, bank account and bottom line.



a man wearing a suit and tie: On The Money: Meadows says Trump willing to sign $1.3T coronavirus bill | Consumer spending slowed in July as coronavirus surge dampened recovery | Only five states making use of Trump's expanded unemployment benefits


© Bonnie Cash
On The Money: Meadows says Trump willing to sign $1.3T coronavirus bill | Consumer spending slowed in July as coronavirus surge dampened recovery | Only five states making use of Trump’s expanded unemployment benefits

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THE BIG DEAL-Meadows says Trump willing to sign $1.3 trillion coronavirus bill: White House chief of staff Mark Meadows said Friday that President Trump would sign a coronavirus relief package totaling $1.3 trillion, an increase

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Donald Trump wields fear in pitch for 4 more years

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As he laid out his case for reelection, President Donald Trump deployed a powerful, and familiar, political tactic: fear.

In a tradition-defying convention address delivered from the White House, Trump painted a grim portrait of violence in American cities run by Democrats and populated by voters who largely oppose him. Though his depictions were at odds with the full reality on the ground in those cities, Trump held himself up as the last best hope for keeping lawlessness from reaching suburban communities — the same communities where he needs to stem the tide of voters turning against the Republican Party.

“Your vote will decide whether we protect law-abiding Americans, or whether we give free rein to violent anarchists, agitators and criminals who threaten our citizens,” Trump declared, adding that the “American way of life” is on the line in his race against Democrat Joe Biden.

Fear has long been

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Abe resignation may rile US-Japan ties calmed by personal bond with Trump

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Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s surprise resignation could raise the potential for friction between Washington and Tokyo, shaped for years by the Japanese leader’s assertive foreign policy and warm relationship with President Trump.

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“He’s the only leader of a major democracy who has had good relations with Trump from beginning to end,” the American Enterprise Institute’s Zack Cooper observed. “We can’t expect the next prime minister to have that kind of relationship.”

Abe cited poor health in his resignation announcement, ending a record-setting, eight-year run at the top of Japan’s political system. His departure means that a comparative newcomer will be tasked with overseeing Japan’s rise as a military and diplomatic heavyweight in the midst of an economic crisis caused by the coronavirus pandemic, as the United States and democratic allies seek to manage the threats emanating from an increasingly confrontational China.

“The basis impact of him leaving

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Trump vs. Biden: After RNC, DNC, two leaders’ economic visions offer real choice

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Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and President Donald Trump may be vying for the same undecided voters, but after their Party’s conventions over the past two weeks, it’s clear they’re offering sharply different ideas for America’s economic future.

Spurred on by the left-wing of his party, Biden is proposing to invest the federal government with sweeping new powers to tax, regulate, and spend its way to his version of a Green New Deal.

RNC SHOWS US WHAT TRUMP, GOP-LED ECONOMY WOULD LOOK LIKE VS. BIDEN, RADICAL LEFT’S VISION

Trump is talking about doing exactly the opposite, devolving power to businesses and workers through lower taxes, less regulation and a lighter touch from the federal government.

Both Biden

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AP Analysis: Trump wields fear in pitch for 4 more years

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President Donald Trump speaks from the South Lawn of the White House on the fourth day of the Republican National Convention, Thursday, Aug. 27, 2020, in Washington.

AP

As he laid out his case for reelection, President Donald Trump deployed a powerful, and familiar, political tactic: fear.

In a tradition-defying convention address delivered from the White House, Trump painted a grim portrait of violence in American cities run by Democrats and populated by voters who largely oppose him. Though his depictions were at odds with the full reality on the ground in those cities, Trump held himself up as the last best hope for keeping lawlessness from reaching suburban communities — the same communities where he needs to stem the tide of voters turning against the Republican Party.

“Your vote will decide whether we protect law-abiding Americans, or whether we give free rein to violent anarchists, agitators

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Trump wields fear in pitch for 4 more years

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President Donald Trump speaks from the South Lawn of the White House on the fourth day of the Republican National Convention, Thursday, Aug. 27, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)


© Provided by Associated Press
President Donald Trump speaks from the South Lawn of the White House on the fourth day of the Republican National Convention, Thursday, Aug. 27, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

WASHINGTON (AP) — As he laid out his case for reelection, President Donald Trump deployed a powerful, and familiar, political tactic: fear.

In a tradition-defying convention address delivered from the White House, Trump painted a grim portrait of violence in American cities run by Democrats and populated by voters who largely oppose him. Though his depictions were at odds with the full reality on the ground in those cities, Trump held himself up as the last best hope for keeping lawlessness from reaching suburban communities — the same communities where he needs to stem the tide of voters turning against the Republican Party.



President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump stand on the South Lawn of the White House on the fourth day of the Republican National Convention, Thursday, Aug. 27, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)


© Provided by Associated Press
President Donald Trump and first lady Melania

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Trump $300 in jobless aid: Only 5 states so far are paying benefits

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On August 8, President Donald Trump said his executive order to provide an additional $400 in weekly jobless aid to the nation’s 26.3 million unemployed workers would provide “immediate” relief. But almost three weeks after he signed the order, only five states so far are paying out the federal portion of the extra benefits, which amounts to $300.

Those states are Arizona, Louisiana, Missouri, Tennessee and Texas, according to tracking site UnemploymentPUA.com, which received confirmation from those states’ unemployment offices or residents who supplied evidence of payment. Texas was one of the first states, along with Arizona, to begin paying claims this month, according to a spokesperson for the Texas Workforce Commission. 

Dozens of additional states have been approved for the extra jobless aid, which is disbursed from $44 billion in disaster relief funds through FEMA. States must apply to FEMA for the funding, and then set up their systems

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President Trump touts US economic recovery, warns Joe Biden will crater stocks

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This is a rush transcript from “Your World,” August 24, 2020. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

NEIL CAVUTO, FOX NEWS ANCHOR: Thank you, Bill, very, very much.

Well, that plasma relief that has been talked about by the White House is one of the reasons stocks were jumping today. We’re going to get into that in a second.

The president speaking right now in North Carolina. The Republican Convention has formally kicked off. And rare is it that the nominee intended plans to speak every single day of the convention, so no surprise appearance by and on Thursday and Thursday only, the big event, of course, when the president accepts that nomination at the White House, with a follow-up of fireworks.

John Roberts following all these fast-moving developments for you, as “Your World” kicks off. It’s about 4:00 p.m. Eastern time, everybody.

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With horrible pandemic and economic news and cratering personal polling, Trump — with zero evidence — attacks election integrity

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